Summer 2019 issue of the Expert Witness newsletter (volume 23, issue 1)

Contents: In this issue of The Expert Witness, we present two articles: From the Desk of Christopher Bruce: Farewell Christopher Bruce publishes his final Expert Witness newsletter. In this article, Chris writes about his achievements and the founding of Economica. Selecting the Productivity Factor In this article, the economists discuss the real rate of growth earnings, […]

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A Word from the Consultants of Economica

We would like to say thank you to Dr. Christopher Bruce. You have been a great mentor for us throughout our careers with Economica. You have provided direction, leadership, advice, and have groomed us to be one of the leading firms in the industry. Your knowledge, guidance, and support throughout the years have been a […]

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Selecting the Productivity Factor

One of the most important determinants of the plaintiff’s future earnings is the rate at which those earnings will grow. There are two broad determinants of this rate. First, each individual benefits from increases that arise from gains in experience, promotions, and job changes. Second, as the economy grows, the earnings of all individuals rise […]

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Fall 2018 issue of the Expert Witness newsletter (volume 22, issue 3)

Contents: In this issue of The Expert Witness, we present two articles: The Cost of Household Services, Alberta, 2018: A Survey The cost of hiring individuals to perform household services such as housecleaning, snow removal, and handyman repairs can amount to a significant percentage of the damages in a personal injury or fatal accident claim. […]

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The Impact of a Mid-Career Change on Earnings

by Derek Aldridge and Christopher J. Bruce  Vocational psychologists often recommend that injured plaintiffs retrain for a new occupation. An important question that arises in this situation is whether plaintiffs will start that occupation at an “entry-level” income (say the income of a 25 year-old) or at the income of an individual of the plaintiff’s calendar […]

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The Cost of Household Services, Alberta, 2018: A Survey

by Christopher J. Bruce and Jody Prevost The cost of hiring individuals to perform household services such as housecleaning, snow removal, and handyman repairs can amount to a significant percentage of the damages in a personal injury or fatal accident claim. Yet, despite the importance of these costs, reliable estimates of the components of a household services […]

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The Cost of Managing the Expenditures of a Plaintiff with Reduced Mental Capacity

by Christopher J. Bruce When referring to plaintiffs with normal mental capacity, the term “management fee” usually refers to expenses that plaintiffs incur for advice concerning investment decisions. Decisions concerning how their awards are to be spent – on medical care, accommodation, transportation, etc. – can generally be left to the plaintiffs themselves. Plaintiffs who have […]

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The Cost of Managing the Plaintiff’s Investments

by Christopher J. Bruce As most individuals are unaccustomed to managing large sums of money, it may be appropriate for plaintiffs to employ advisors to assist them with the investment of their awards. In these cases, it has often been argued that the cost of hiring such advisors should be added to the value of the […]

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Spring 2018 issue of the Expert Witness newsletter (volume 22, issue 1)

Contents: This issue contains one article. Christopher Bruce investigates the principles that the courts have developed to determine whether experts and their evidence should be admitted into court. Admissibility of Expert Evidence: Personal Injury Litigation Dr. Bruce argues that these principles can usefully be divided into four categories: the requirement that expert testimony be useful; the identification of […]

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Admissibility of Expert Evidence: Personal Injury Litigation

by Christopher J. Bruce The admission of expert evidence has required that the courts maintain a fine balance between, on the one hand, caution against the possibility that witnesses may usurp the court’s role of forming opinions and drawing conclusions; and, on the other hand, recognition of the fact that juries and triers of fact may […]

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